Author Archives: nhanus

About nhanus

Nancy Hanus is a visiting editor in residence at the Michigan State University School of Journalism. She formerly was director of new media at The Detroit News, in charge of the Web site, www.detnews.com.

Class soundslides

Mo Hnatiuk: Flint fires and Hometown Rock Crown

Craig Ebinger: NFL draft and NBA playoffs

Lindsay Nowak: The small town of Bath, Michigan

Nick Bryant: Battle of the Bands and South Complex Construction

Lauren McKown: Hutaree Militia – Clayton, Mich.

Comments Off on Class soundslides

Filed under Uncategorized

Welcome, students! Use this blog well

It’s time to start blogging! For those of you who have blogged before, you know the drill. Short, tight and lively prose laced with meaningful links, photos, maps, embedded videos — all those extras you have come to expect in good blogs you read.

Students edit on computers in class.

Students in the fall Journalism 200 class were happy bloggers, as you can see. with AP Stylebook in hand, no less.

Because this blog is now entering its fourth semester, there are a lot of examples of student work represented here. I suggest those of you new to blogs — and even the rest of you — take some time to look at what’s been done. You’ll see where students have shined when writing about a freaky veggie or MSU’s organic farm, and where they have limped by. The more effort you put in, the more you will be rewarded.

At the end of the semester, two of your blogs will be graded, and they will be worth 10 percent of your grade. So practice now — and get the kinks out. You’ll be a lot better and smoother when it counts, and you’ll end up a blogging pro!

Comments Off on Welcome, students! Use this blog well

Filed under Nancy: Instructor blogs

Welcome, new students!

It was great meeting all of you in the first class of JRN 200 on Thursday. I look forward to working with all of you this semester. I hope you are looking forward to learning a lot — and to having some fun. Please feel free to blog in this area whenever you’d like. It’s a sandbox for you and for the class, and a place for you to interact with your fellow students.

Have a great weekend, and I’ll see all of you on Tuesday!

Comments Off on Welcome, new students!

Filed under Nancy: Instructor blogs

Covering a class live

JRN 200 live event

Comments Off on Covering a class live

Filed under Miscellaneous

Interesting story about The New York Times

New York Times team

New York Times team

The New York Times, like most other newspapers, is in dire financial straits, so much so that it is selling off a building and putting ads on its front page. Behind the scenes is a team of innovators. This is a story about what they are doing. I thought you might find it interesting!

Comments Off on Interesting story about The New York Times

Filed under Nancy: Instructor blogs

Welcome, new students!

Welcome to Journalism 200, the course that I hope will help solidify your love for writing, news and the exciting field of journalism. This class is not easy; there will be a lot of work, and you will probably at some point in the semester (maybe several points) curse me for the style quizzes, the current events quizzes, the constant reminders to source everything. But I hope you will learn a lot, too.

This blog is a place where we can all have fun and learn together. I’ve left last semester’s work on here so you can see what students before you have done in JRN 200. Most of what they did here was extra, above and beyond what we required. If you do the same, you are very likely to do much better in this class than if you just do the minimum.

Feel free to suggest changes and updates to this blog. It’s yours, and we want to find ways to stretch it and use it as a learning tool.

Good luck to all of you, and welcome to JRN 200!

Your instructor,

Nancy

Comments Off on Welcome, new students!

Filed under Nancy: Instructor blogs

Public affairs stories

Some of you are still struggling to find public affairs stories for your fourth out of class assignment. Here’s an example of one out of the Van Buren School District that I saw this morning. It’s not governmental or filled with statistics — but it is an example of a reporter keeping her eyes open to a story that is likely to have readers saying “That’s just ridicuolous!” or “Good for them — that’s my money, and teachers don’t need coffee pots in their classrooms, anyway.” 

Talk to teachers, firefighters, cops — listen to the building inspectors, construction workers or the people at the coffee shop who work in the state office building down the street. There are stories EVERYWHERE. 

This one is just one of many.

Comments Off on Public affairs stories

Filed under Nancy: Instructor blogs